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Where is Dick Cheney During the Gulf Oil Spill?





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Former Vice President (and former Halliburton CEO) Dick Cheney, so vocal during the first year of President Obama's administration in his attempt to scare us to death on national security, has been remarkably silent since the Gulf oil spill began its slow motion march into the nation's consciousness. 

There was not a decision on war or energy the current president made that was not questioned, even ridiculed, by the former Bush Administration number one two. However, since the Deepwater Horizon began its slow motion process of turning the Gulf into a dead zone, Mr. Cheney has been remarkably silent.
Why Is Dick Cheney Silent on the Oil Spill?

NEWSWEEK - 6/10/10: The former vice president is usually a vociferous defender of his time in government. But not on the disaster in the gulf. When the Obama administration, or the media, or just about anybody contradicts Dick Cheney's views on national security, he is far from shy about responding. But facing a firestorm of criticism over the oil spill, he's been notably silent. More than national security, energy policy and the oil industry might be considered Cheney's real areas of expertise. He was chairman and CEO of oil-services company Halliburton between 1995 and 2000. And, of course, he worked prominently on energy.

Halliburton was working on the Deepwater Horizon rig just before it blew up, opening the well and sending oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico. Some experts have speculated that the company may have been to blame for the explosion. The pro-oil atmosphere (and Cheney's continued links to Halliburton) during his vice presidency, have also come to the fore since the April 20 accident.
What is a more important to our national security than our dependence on fossil fuels during an unprecedented catastrophe involving oil? Is this not the former VP's expertise?  Continued...


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